Pupil Premium

 

What is Pupil Premium?

Pupil Premium or Disadvantaged Funding is an amount of money that is given to schools by the government to support children who are in receipt of free school meals (or have been in in the last six years), children who are in care, and children of Armed Forces families.

 

Barriers to Educational Achievement

Many of our pupils arrive at our school with negative perceptions of education. They have difficulty in accessing the learning in a mainstream classroom due to their Social Emotional or Mental Health needs that then impact on their behaviour in school. Some of our pupils have related conditions such as Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD0, Foetal Alcohol Associated Disorder (FASD), Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), Attachment Difficulties, Speech, Language or Communication Difficulties. They may also have difficulties with co-ordination and fine motor skills such as Dyspraxia, or conditions such as Dyslexia or Dyscalculia, which affect their ability to read or develop mathematical skills. All of these impact on a child’s ability to focus, to learn and to develop the skills they need in order to achieve their academic potential. In addition, a significant number of children are involved with social care agencies or are categorised as being from areas of high social deprivation. The interventions we employ at Eslington are designed to diminish the difference and ensure that all of our pupils make the progress that they are cognitively capable of making.

 

2018-19 Funding Statement

The school is receiving £79,652 of Pupil Premium Funding and we will be building on the 2017-18 initiatives in the following ways:

  • Opportunity for access to the music service for all PP Children in school
  • Renewal of Spellodrome and Mathletics for the next academic year
  • Key workers and therapists for PP children who need support for their emotional well being
  • Whole school, and individual Raising Achievement initiatives and trips
  • Funded music lessons and financial support for extra-curricular trips where appropriate

 

     

     

    How Funding was used in 2017-18

     

    The amount of Pupil Premium funding received by Eslington Primary School last year was £53,320.  At Eslington Primary School, the Pupil Premium has funded a number of activities and interventions to support pupil progress and attainment.  These have included:

     

    • One-to-one interventions in English using Read Write Inc strategies and individual programmes.
    • Release of the SENDCo to oversee and carry out analysis of vulnerable groups of children and support teachers and teaching assistants to plan interventions.
    • Therapeutic interventions for individual vulnerable pupils e.g. Play Therapy.
    • Parenting support sessions e.g. 1,2,3 Magic ParentingTM programme held across the year to support parents with managing challenging behaviour at home.
    • The employment of Family Support workers to support families through home visits and individual interventions at school.
    • Supporting pupils financially who attended school residential visits and other extra-curricular activities.
    • Cognitive Behaviour and Play Therapy for 11 children.
    • Resources for teaching of: Plan, do, review.
    • Cyber coach software for morning dance activities.
    • Fine Motor Skills boxes in each classroom to improve fluency in writing.

     

     

     

    Impact of Funding in 2017-18

     

    The impact of the pupil premium resources across the school can be seen by:

     

    • 75% of pupils made expected progress in line with national expectations in maths (with some making exceptional progress).
    • 85% of pupils made expected progress in line with national expectations in reading (with some making exceptional progress).
    • 65% of pupils made at least expected progress in line with national expectations in writing (with some making exceptional progress).
    • An increase in attendance at 1,2,3 Magic Parenting programmes and coffee mornings.
    • A decrease in behavioural issues for children receiving therapeutic interventions.